100 Classic Hikes in Utah: or, I get to explore more hiking trails!

 

 

 

 

I recently signed a contract with The Mountaineers Books to write a guidebook to be called 100 Classic Hikes in Utah. Part of their “100 classic hikes” series, it will cover the best, most popular, most loved, and/or most dramatic hikes in the state. (That will be somewhat subjective, of course, but I hope to adhere mostly to universally acknowledged stupendous hikes!) There will be short jaunts, day-long hikes, and extended overnight backpack trips.

 

To say I’m excited is a slim description. I’ve already done a lot of the hikes that will be included, but there are some I still need to set foot upon. That’s a lot of traveling I’ll be doing this year. Ah, so many more days and nights out under the vast Utah sky, getting to explore new places, deepening my appreciation for the natural wonders of this state…. Pretty damn cool, really.

 

endless views of tilting sandstone rumpus out to the Henry Mtns

endless views of the tilting sandstone rumpus out to the Henry Mtns, from Navajo Knobs in Capitol Reef

 

The names alone of many Utah hikes are enough to pique curiosity. In general, Utah has some of the damnedest place names I’ve ever seen. They’re awesome, really. Ed Abbey wrote about place names in southern Utah in Desert Solitaire, calling them “the folk poetry of the pioneers.” A great list, which maybe in some other post I’ll quote at length.

 

Consider what hikes with these names might look like: Chocolate Drops Trail. Little Death Hollow. Fiery Furnace. Robbers Roost Canyon. Black Dragon Canyon. Angels Landing. Dead Horse Point. Goblin Valley. Cheesebox Canyon. Ferns Nipple. Desolation Lake. Amethyst Lake. Lost Lake. Fable Valley. Beartrap Fork. Donut Falls.

 

unexpected blooms found in Pine Creek/Box Death Hollow (I believe it's a Richardson's Geranium but not sure)

unexpected blooms found in Pine Creek/Box Death Hollow (I believe it’s a Richardson’s Geranium but not sure)

 

Don’t you love it when your imagination may take flight and soar in giddy wonder when regarding names like that? Or places like Bryce Canyon (which has its own great trail names, such as Fairyland Loop Trail).

 

geologic beauty of Bryce Canyon in winter

geologic beauty of Bryce Canyon in winter

 

Enough rambling now. I have a lot of hiking and writing to plan out for my year.

 

Utah wildlife like this bighorn sheep can be abundant on many backcountry trails

Utah wildlife like these bighorn sheep can be abundant on many backcountry trails

 

 

3 Comments

Filed under Hikes, Random Musings

3 Responses to 100 Classic Hikes in Utah: or, I get to explore more hiking trails!

  1. Ann

    Congratulations on the contract! I hope it comes with gas money! And a stipend for pie and raspberry shakes

    • Julie

      Thanks, Ann! Yes, there’s some gas money, as well as some left over for pie & raspberry shake. 😉 I’m super psyched about the project! I do have a working list, but I’m open to suggestions from people, for sure. If you have any, share them with me. I’ll need hiking buddies, too…. :)

  2. Pingback: find your natural high in the high Uintas | Wild Girl Writing

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